Posted 20 minutes ago
ahmdrajabi:

A Jewish woman and a Palestinian woman protesting together in 1973, 1992, and 2001.

ahmdrajabi:

A Jewish woman and a Palestinian woman protesting together in 1973, 1992, and 2001.

Posted 28 minutes ago
Posted 29 minutes ago

active-rva:

A march on Eid-al-Fitr in solidarity with the population of Gaza, which has been under sustained attack since early this month. About sixty people were present at this march in Richmond, Virginia, on July 28th. 

If your photo, or a photo of your child, is in this set and you would like it removed, please message Active-RVA here, or e-mail us at activerva@gmail.com.

You can see the entire album here. To keep up with other Palestinian solidarity events in the Richmond area, see this group, Richmond United for Palestine

Posted 29 minutes ago

12 Black Woman Spoken Word Poets Everyone Should Know

oddballsdontbounce:

by beloved Michelle Denise Jackson :) honored to be on a list with so many people i love

Posted 29 minutes ago

postracialcomments:

Keven Stonewall Is On His Way To Finding A Cure For Cancer

19 year old Stonewallhopes to one day create a vaccine that will eradicate colon cancer. The Chicago South Side youth has already started working on a potential cancer cure at a Rush University laboratory.

The youth’s love of science began back in fifth grade, when he became fascinated by the appearance of cells under a microscope. Stonewall’s love of the sciences grew to such extremes that one Christmas he was gifted four microscopes by his parents who are educators. It was during his freshman year at the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences that Stonewall began focusing on the need for the eradication of colon cancer.  He watched not only a dear friend’s uncle succumb to the disease but witnessed first hand how the illness negatively impacted his school mate, telling DNAInfo Chicago, “Cancer has taken over a whole bunch of lives, and I felt like I needed to step up and do something about it.”

Stonewall was a senior in high school when he jumped on the opportunity to do an internship at the university, which is the academic arm of the Rush Medical Center.  He worked in the lab with a professor who taught immunology/microbiology and general surgery. Stonewall began to consume literature about how a chemotherapeutic agent could possibly destroy certain cancer cells while still promoting a healthy immune response.

The young researcher, who has already won numerous awards for his research and was a finalist for theIntel International Science and Engineer Fairlast year, then began testing his potential vaccine on mice. He injected a concentrated amount of the cancer-treating drugMitoxantronein younger and older mice. Stonewall then injected the rodents with aggressive colon cancer cells.

Stonewall waited three days to check out the effects of his experiment: The younger mice benefitted from the vaccine as their cancer was in fact eradicated and they had developed immunity.  The older mice were still ridden with the cancerous tumors.

“[He] should be heralded for helping to develop more effective colon cancer treatments that will impact the elderly, the population that is most susceptible to colon cancer.  He has all the tools. He will go far.”

Stonewall, who is now a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, is still working on the vaccine that he prays will one day be tested on humans.  The young man is keeping hope alive that his work will in fact be the answer to a dreaded disease that has taken the lives of many, so until then, he tells the New York Daily News, “If you don’t plan to succeed, you’re planning to fail.”

Source

Positive news for Chicago

Posted 30 minutes ago
Poetry [is] pretty much the only art form in which the practitioners are regularly called upon to explain if and how their art will solve society’s ills. I’ve never seen or heard an interview with Jack White that asks him how his guitar solo on “Ball and Biscuit” will cure cancer and stave off the zombie apocalypse. I once worried about the fairness of this paradigm, but I’m starting to see it as a show of respect. That people keep wondering how poetry will change the world seems to start with the implicit assumption that it could.
Posted 1 hour ago
anoncentral:

The American Justice System - zoom pic > read it > share it everywhere you can.

anoncentral:

The American Justice System - zoom pic > read it > share it everywhere you can.

(Source: basedinternet)

Posted 1 hour ago

confessionalisms:

midnight-sun-rising:

teddythemonster:

midnight-sun-rising:

I’m finally watching Fruitvale Station.

grab a box of tissue

Oh man! It’s that bad? Smh

That movie hit me in way that none of y’all would ever understand… I bawled and couldn’t stop it. So much so the people I were with freaked out until I explained. It’s a very touching movie.

I was just saying how I still needed to see this movie when I was at Poetry and Pancakes Saturday night.

Posted 1 hour ago
Maybe poems are made of breath, the way water,
cajoled to boil, says, This is my soul, freed.
Dean Young, from “Scarecrow on Fire” (via proustitute)
Posted 1 hour ago

4th Circuit overturns Virginia's gay marriage ban

politicalprof:

The 4th Circuit is generally seen as the most conservative in the US. A new era has clearly begun.

Ht: EE

Posted 5 hours ago

buttonpoetry:

Update! Our 2014 Chapbook Contest, which is in full swing, is now open through August 31st, and we’ve DOUBLED the prize money to $500. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to get your poems published and filmed by Button Poetry! Submit here.

Posted 5 hours ago
I have a big thing about endings. I don’t know what it is, but I really think endings just make or break a poem for me. When I see a good ending I die with envy. (Chop off the reader’s head! Stab us in the neck! Make us ring and ring!) Also, have a big thing for finding the right balance. I love it when a poem is working on many levels, when it’s got that exciting music and sound work (oh rhymes!), but also has that great plain language that gives it the guts, the ‘I am a real human being writing this, not a robot’ part, and then finally, I like a poem with a lot of capital H (Heart). I’m a fan of the ‘big ticket’ stuff; I like a poem that’s not scared to raise the stakes while also making sure it’s not too manipulative in how it uses its emotional currency. I ask a lot of my own work and fail a great deal, but I’m always trying to get it right. I’m always trying to balance that egg upright at the end of the table so it’s sturdy enough that I can slam the door shut without it shattering.
Ada Limón, interviewed by Suzannah Windsor for Compose Journal (via bostonpoetryslam)
Posted 5 hours ago
I don’t ask for much, truth be told, I’d settle for a life less frightening.
Rise Against
Posted 9 hours ago
A poet’s work … to name the unnamable, to point at frauds, to take sides, start arguments, shape the world and stop it from going to sleep.
Salman Rushdie (via observando)
Posted 9 hours ago

​The Two Organizations Trying to Destroy U.S. Science Education

greenthepress:

This is a story that needs to be shared. 

Fossil fuel money backs the Heartland Institute, which has been working to dismantle the teaching of global warming in public schools.

This latest development shows how far they’re willing to go to push their anti-science education agenda.